Conservation
       
     
Red-tailed black-cockatoo
       
     
Protect dead trees
       
     
Predator fence
       
     
Retreating glacier
       
     
Snares in Swaziland
       
     
Newly hatched
       
     
Orientation
       
     
Aquaculture
       
     
Conservation
       
     
Conservation

The stories and science of saving species.

Red-tailed black-cockatoo
       
     
Red-tailed black-cockatoo

This female red-tailed black-cockatoo is returning to her nest in the late afternoon, where her newly hatched chick waits for food. The south-eastern subspecies of red-tailed black-cockatoo, Calyptorhynchus banksii graptogyne, is one of Australia's most endangered parrots. Its population numbers no more than 1500 birds, all of whom occur in an isolated area of south-west Victoria and south-east South Australia.

Victoria, Australia

Protect dead trees
       
     
Protect dead trees

This dead river red gum is a nest tree of the endangered south-eastern red-tailed black-cockatoo. Trees this size can have several hollows that are large enough for cockatoos, although plenty of other birds and mammals use the hollows too. It is critically important that these large, dead trees are protected, as they provide the most important nesting habitat for the red-tailed black-cockatoo that we know of.

Victoria, Australia

Predator fence
       
     
Predator fence

This fence surrounds Epping Forest National Park in central Queensland, attempt to exclude predators from interacting with the critically endangered northern hairy-nosed wombat, Lasiorhinus krefftii. Epping contains the last fragments of this species, which was once widespread across central-eastern Australia. An insurance population was created in 2009 in another park in southern Queensland. 

Epping Forest National Park, Queensland, Australia

Retreating glacier
       
     
Retreating glacier

We visited Fox and Franz Josef glaciers in western New Zealand. Along the track are signs showing the glaciers' position in previous years. I was shocked by how quickly it had retreated to the position that we saw it at. A powerful and pertinent display of climate change in action. 

Franz Josef glacier, New Zealand

Snares in Swaziland
       
     
Snares in Swaziland

From one small park in one small African country, 20,000 snares were removed. As the sign says, these snares outnumber the all of the ungulates present in the whole country, which is shocking on its own. 

Swaziland.

Newly hatched
       
     
Newly hatched

Life is tough for the just-hatched sea turtle. After digging their way from the nest, they have to scramble across the beach and rocks to find their way to the sea. Predators like seagulls and reef sharks are waiting. It's estimated that only 1 in 1000 sea turtles survive to maturity.

Heron Island, Australia.

Orientation
       
     
Orientation

Sea turtles navigate to the sea using light cues. In the past this strategy served them well, as the sun or the moon on the water would be an reliable light cue to follow. Today, unfortunately, turtles get confused by artificial light from humans. In some areas they frequently travel inland instead of the to the water. 

Heron Island, Australia.

Aquaculture
       
     
Aquaculture

Sea cages grow seafood for human consumption, alongside an overwater community in Thailand. Many reefs have been severely overfished, meaning that people have now turned to fish farming as an alternative method of securing seafood.

Thailand.